Purchase the book for $9.99 and get the Kindle version for .99 cents!  Available alone as Kindle or in ePub and other formats at Smashwords: $2.99

Purchase the book for $9.99 and get the Kindle version for .99 cents!  Available alone as Kindle or in ePub and other formats at Smashwords: $2.99

Welcome to the site about John Holt , a teacher and writer who advocated more humane classrooms and then, when he sensed such school reform was not really wanted by most people, became one of the founders of the homeschooling movement, which Holt originally called "unschooling." Unschooling—learning that doesn't look like school nor has to happen at home—is an effective way to work with, not on, young children and teenagers to help them learn.

Unschooling is also documented in the pages of the magazine Holt founded, Growing Without Schooling (GWS), as are articles, audio, and video recordings of Holt and other pioneers of learning without schooling.

You will also find information, research, and support for learning outside of school.
—Patrick Farenga

Unschooling.com: "This book is full of inspiration. Each person who reads this book will find essays that speak to them . . . Reading these essays, I have found new ideas, been introduced to new people, and now I can find more great things to read."

Reviews of The Legacy of John Holt

"John Holt’s Escape from Childhood: The Needs and Rights of Children, is as fresh and thought-provoking today as it was when it was first published 39 years ago."—Dr. Peter Gray, Author of Free to Learn (Basic Books, 2013)

Pat Farenga's Blog

Pat Farenga's Blog
Experiential Learning and Earning College Credit

An interest-led learning opportunity in Peru for teens and young adults and a new guide for earning college credit for what you know . . .

Parental Involvement with Children's Schoolwork is Overrated

"Most people, asked whether parental involvement benefits children academically, would say, “of course it does.” But evidence from our research suggests otherwise. In fact, most forms of parental involvement, like observing a child’s class, contacting a school about a child’s behavior, helping to decide a child’s high school courses, or helping a child with homework, do not improve student achievement. In some cases, they actually hinder it . . . "

. . . The main reason I mention James is because of how quickly things are changing for people without college degrees. Google is now not only hiring people like James—they recruit them . . .